Public Involvement in Health and Social Care

We commissioned ODS Consulting to explore future possibilities for public involvement in health and social care in Scotland. This is in the context of planned changes to integrate, or bring together, health and social care services – currently delivered through the NHS and local authorities. A "think piece" was produced alongside this research, setting out ideas and prompts for discussion about the future of public involvement in health and social care.

Between June and September 2013, we ran four events in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Perth and Sanquhar to discuss the ideas raised by the research and think piece. These events brought together members of the public, health and social care practitioners, and other interested individuals (for example from the voluntary and community sector). The events were very well attended, with a total of over 200 people attending the sessions.

Cover of "Learning from Communities" report

Learning from our communities: Public involvement in adult health and social care in Scotland PDF document
This report summarises the key themes and messages which emerged from the four public events held in the summer of 2013. Participants considered the value of a national outcome for public involvement in health and social care; whether there was potential to create a single standard for public involvement in health and social care; and to what extent there should be national consistency in the permanent, formal structures for public involvement located in each health and social care partnership area.

Cover of Future Requirements and Possibilities for Public Involvement in Health and Social Care

Future Requirements and Possibilities for Public Involvement in Health and Social CarePDF document
We commissioned research to explore the future possibilities for public involvement in Scotland, in the context of planned integration between adult health and social care services. The report includes sections on existing experiences of public involvement and future possibilities and lessons learned from four in depth case studies of public involvement in health and social care in Scotland. These case studies were East Renfrewshire, Dundee, Highland and West Lothian. (ODS Consulting, 2013)

Cover of Future Requirements and Possibilities for Public Involvement in Health and Social Care summary

Summary of Key FindingsPDF document
This report summarises the key findings of the research which explored the future possibilities for public involvement in Scotland, in the context of planned integration between adult health and social care services. The report sets out the key issues raised by the research.

Future Requirements and Possibilities for Public Involvement in Health and Social Care - think piece

Think PiecePDF document
This short "think piece" outlines some ideas about how people – as individuals and communities – could be involved in discussions and decisions about health and social care in Scotland in the future. It was used to prompt discussions at the four public events held in the summer of 2013.

West Lothian Children’s Rights Forum – Having Your Say

Case study: West Lothian Children’s Rights Forum – Having Your SayPDF document
The West Lothian Having Your Say Forum was set up ten years ago as part of the wider participation agenda, to give looked-after children and young people a voice and a structure to influence decision makers. The Forum is funded by West Lothian Council and was designed for children or young people aged 5 to 15 years old with experience of the care system. The project is managed by the Children’s Rights Officer for West Lothian Council and supported by health and social care partners including NHS Lothian and West Lothian Community Health and Care Partnership.

Falkirk Reshaping Care for Older People Co-production Model

Case Study: Falkirk Reshaping Care for Older People Co-production ModelPDF document
The Reshaping Care for Older People Co-production Model in Falkirk was funded by the Change Fund and piloted in Bo’ness and Blackness. Older people were involved in the design and delivery of local services, enabling them to maintain their independence for as long as possible. The project used an asset-based community development approach to harness the skills and knowledge of older people, and their relationships with the wider community and services. Participants were encouraged to work in partnership to develop and agree outcomes for health and social care providers.